Petfinder Featured Pet

Friday, July 27, 2012

A Tail of Two Kitties...

It was the best of weeks, it was the worst of weeks. 

A phone call came into our office about a kitten with a missing leg, would we take a look at it.  It came from a family that helps us with our TNR (Trap Neuter Release) program in town, so I knew this kitten was a "stray" and that if an issue was present, it would be at our expense since the program barely covers spay/neuter costs at $25 per cat.  Through the door comes a person with a carrier.  A foul odor is emanating from the pet carrier in which the cutest 5-6 week old, long haired black kitten resides.  The carrier seems inappropriately large for such a tiny resident, and the kitten is obviously scared by the jostling of the kennel and the noises to which it is unaccustomed.

We open the cage door and the kitten, tiny enough to be held in one hand, is so skinny.  One leg is missing.  When the phone call came in, I was unsure whether the arm was a congenital defect that was present at birth, a wound that occurred after birth and was old but healed, or whether it was a fresh wound. 

As I handled this kitten, I could feel the heat and moisture in my hand that was coming from the wound hidden beneath the incredibly long fur with which this kitten was blessed.

The kitten in his new "apartment" with the doll my daughter gave him for company.

Being so young, and so skinny, sedation was going to be risky, but had to be done.  Beneath the fur was a wound.  The front left leg of this tiny kitten, had been ripped off from half way down the humerus.  All that remained of this kitten's arm was a rotting stump of the remainder of the humerus bone and its overlying skin.  The arm's muscles had all been stripped away.  This baby was lucky it did not bleed to death at the time of injury.

The wound was old.  There was no fresh blood, no fresh bleeding.  The flesh was black, putrid, and the maggots were in their larval stage indicating the wound was at least 5 days old, or older.




TO BE CONTINUED....




Become a fan of our Veterinary Rescuer Blog page on Facebook here: http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/pages/Veterinary-Rescuer-Blog/133173784037 .

You are invited to share a link of the blog
http://www.vetrescue.blogspot.com/ on Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter.

If you would like to receive this blog into your email inbox each time it is published, go to
http://www.vetrescue.blogspot.com/ , and enter your name into the subscribe box on the upper right side of the page. The blog will send you a confirmation email. Reply as instructed in the email to confirm your subscription. This is a required step. You will then receive the blog as it is published. You will not get junk mail as a result of subscribing!

Become a fan of our Veterinary Rescuer Blog page on Facebook here: http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/pages/Veterinary-Rescuer-Blog/133173784037 .

You are invited to share a link of the blog
http://www.vetrescue.blogspot.com/ on Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter.

If you would like to receive this blog into your email inbox each time it is published, go to
http://www.vetrescue.blogspot.com/ , and enter your name into the subscribe box on the upper right side of the page. The blog will send you a confirmation email. Reply as instructed in the email to confirm your subscription. This is a required step. You will then receive the blog as it is published. You will not get junk mail as a result of subscribing!



2 comments:

mohamad aref said...

so nice

Bill Li said...

This is an incredible story. I really admire the work you do as a veterinarian. I've been thinking about becoming a veterinarian myself. I've had a fair share of animals that I've taken in and healed back to health. I love the feeling that you get knowing that you're doing good helping another animal. It seems like such a fulfilling line of work.
Bill Li | http://www.barringtonanimalhospital.com/